In the run-up to the upcoming annual session of the International Seabed Authority, Seas At Risk challenges the governments of EU Member States that are actively supporting the development of deep sea mining to stop doing so and instead champion sustainable production and consumption.

To date, more than 100 fish stocks out of 153 are still being overfished in EU waters and the reduction of unwanted catches remains yet to be solved despite the attempts of regulation at EU level. According to the objectives of the Common Fisheries Policy, discarding and overfishing are practices that have to come to an end within the EU by 2019 and 2020 respectively. However, Seas At Risk doubts that these goals will be achieved within the deadlines.  Progress has been very slow and decisions have often been influenced by economic interests to the detriment of the environment.

The UN's shipping body has settled on the main elements of an interim strategy aiming to decarbonise the sector. Over 170 countries meeting at the International Maritime Organisation in London had some substantive discussion on objectives and ways to decarbonise shipping resulting in a 7-step outline that now needs to be developed into an interim plan due in 2018. One proposal calling for the shipping sector to adopt climate targets in line with the Paris Agreement and decarbonise by the second half of the century gained overwhelming expressions of support but failed to reach a consensus.