Greenhouse gas emissions from three ship types - containerships, bulkers and tankers - could be reduced by a third, on average, by reducing their speed, according to a new independent study that will be presented to the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) next week.  The cumulative savings [1] from reducing the speed of these ships alone could, by 2030, be as much as 12% of shipping’s total remaining carbon budget [2] if the world is to stay under the 1.5ºC global temperature rise, the CE Delft study for NGOs Seas At Risk and Transport & Environment, founding members of the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC), found.

Ministers from countries around the world gathered 5-6 October in Malta for the third Our Ocean conference, hosted by the European Commission. They were joined by NGOs, academics and agencies including Seas at Risk and some of our Members.

On 12-13 October in Tallinn, the Estonian presidency of the EU and the European Commission jointly organised a conference on the implementation and future of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund. Seas At Risk spoke in support of funding for marine protection to achieve healthy productive seas, the basis for thriving coastal communities.