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18 October 2017

Greenhouse gas emissions from three ship types - containerships, bulkers and tankers - could be reduced by a third, on average, by reducing their speed, according to a new independent study that will be presented to the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) next week.  The cumulative savings [1] from reducing the speed of these ships alone could, by 2030, be as much as 12% of shipping’s total remaining carbon budget [2] if the world is to stay under the 1.5ºC global temperature rise, the CE Delft study for NGOs Seas At Risk and Transport & Environment, founding members of the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC), found.

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28 September 2017

Shipping industry proposals for "carbon neutral growth" would mean 4 degree of warming and climate catastrophe. Which shipping companies support that?

17 July 2017

Analysis of the Design Efficiency of Ships that have Entered the Fleet since 2009. 

All ships built after 1 January 2013 need to have an Energy Efficiency Design Index. This measure of design fuel efficiency needs to be better than a reference value which depends on the ship type and size. This study analyses the development of the design efficiency of ships that have entered the fleet from 2009 to 2016. This study finds that the average design efficiency of new ships has improved in recent years. However, the efficiency improvements seem to have stalled in 2016. 

07 June 2017

Governments must implement tighter marine pollution controls or risk further degradation of the oceans, fish stocks and precious ecosystems, the UN is warning this week. Countries are being asked to support a ‘zero draft’ Call To Action at the 2017 UN Ocean Conference in New York that calls for an acceleration of “actions to prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds”. 

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21 February 2017

The European Parliament has agreed to support a proposal from its own Environment Committee to include shipping in the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme (ETS).

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16 January 2017

In this letter CAN Europe, Seas At Risk, Transport & Environment, Carbon Market Watch and the Aviation Environment Federation urge the European Commission to ensure the aviation and maritime sectors reduce emissions in line with the temperature goals of the Paris Agreement.

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11 January 2017

The Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC), a group of NGOs with observer status at the UN’s International Maritime Organisation (IMO), have heavily criticised comments by the head of the IMO warning the EU against taking action to address increasing GHG emissions from ships.

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17 December 2016

In a welcome development the Environment Committee of the European Parliament agreed to support the inclusion of shipping in a revised EU greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme (ETS). Under the proposal shipping would be included in the ETS from 2023 if the International Maritime Organisation fails to establish a global measure by the deadline they agreed earlier this year.

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09 November 2016

Environmental groups strongly criticised the most recent International Maritime Organisation (IMO) response to the Paris Agreement objective of keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees, and in particular the lack of an agreement to establish a greenhouse gas emissions reduction target for the shipping sector. The outcome fails to allay fears that the IMO might be unable to tackle this issue in an effective and timely manner and reinforces the argument that the EU should push ahead with its own regional measure.

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02 November 2016

Clean Shipping Coalition statement to the 70th session of the IMO’s Marine Environment protection Committee in London on 28th October 2016:

“Mr Chairman, when the Clean Shipping Coalition spoke on this issue earlier in the week we expressed our concern that some of the submissions made to this meeting under agenda item 7 [greenhouse gas emissions from ship] lacked ambition and an appropriate sense of urgency. In the outcome of the working group our worst fears have been realised. This can in no-way be seen as a proper response to the challenge laid down by Paris.

We note that a discussion of “levels of ambition” will be part of the lengthy process, but what is urgently needed is a clear indication of the scale of the emissions reductions that are necessary to keep warming below dangerous levels. This is needed to guide further work on measures and to send a crystal clear signal to industry that we are serious about decarbonisation of the sector and that they have to start including this reality in the decisions they are making now.

Why, when a majority of submissions, including from industry, supported setting some kind of target or objective is this missing from the outcome of the working group? It is totally unacceptable that an IMO response to Paris should lack this key element and indeed should then go on to suggest that it is acceptable to wait until 2023 before finally agreeing measures. Keeping warming to 1.5 degrees means net zero carbon emissions around 2030, and you are proposing to wait until 2023 to agree a measure based on no target or objective.

Mr Chairman, it is a source of deep regret that a process that had so much promise on Monday should have stumbled so seriously before the week was out. If this Committee is to send a clear signal to the wider world that it is serious about reducing shipping’s climate impact it needs to revisit this roadmap, and in particular it needs to agree a target by 2018”. 

27 October 2016

Today’s decision by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to cap the sulphur content of marine fuels sold worldwide at 0.5% by 2020 has been applauded by environmental groups Transport & Environment and Seas At Risk, which are members of the Clean Shipping Coalition. This will reduce SO2 emissions – which cause premature deaths from diseases such as lung cancer and heart disease – from shipping by 85% compared with today’s levels.

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20 October 2016

The Arctic is particularly vulnerable to climate change and to the environmental impacts of shipping.

The Arctic is warming at least twice as fast as the global average with emissions of black carbon (sometimes known as soot) making a significant contribution. Ice normally reflects solar radiation but black carbon falling on ice absorbs it helping accelerate warming and ice melt.

Black carbon comes from various sources, but shipping is a significant and growing part of the problem. As the ice melts, ships can shorten their routes by sailing through the Artic sea and shipping activity in the Arctic is predicted to grow significantly.

Seas at Risk is pushing for the International Maritime Organisation to agree measures that would limit black carbon emissions from international shipping.

Dirty ship fuels contribute to black carbon emissions and Seas at Risk is also working with the Clean Arctic Alliance towards a ban on the use of heavy fuel oil (HFO), the dirtiest of ships fuels, in the Arctic. This will reduce black carbon emissions and the risk of a heavy fuel oil spill in the Arctic. The latter is of particular concern as a heavy fuel oil spill in Arctic waters would be impossible to clean up effectively, and have a serious impact on wildlife and the natural resources that the traditional inhabitants of the Arctic often rely on for their livelihoods. For more on the “HFO Free Arctic” campaign look here.

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04 October 2016

Seas at Risk, as part of a new coalition of NGOs, the Clean Arctic Alliance, has developed a position statement asking states to #saynotoHFO. 

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08 June 2016

8 June is the United Nations day for World Oceans. The theme for this year’s celebration is ‘healthy oceans, healthy planet’, yet developments during 2016 have shown just how much more needs to be done to preserve our seas from the effects of human activity. 

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21 November 2014

London – Responding to today’s adoption by the International Maritime Organisation of the long-awaited Polar Code, aimed at regulating shipping in Polar Regions, a coalition of environmental groups criticised the measures for not going far enough to adequately protect the fragile Arctic and Antarctic environments. 

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10 October 2014

London - NGOs call on shipping industry regulator to drive down costs, trigger improved fuel efficiency and reduce ship GHG emissions through efficiency data transparency. 

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04 April 2014

London, 4th April 2014 – The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) has abandoned the fixed start date of 2016 for the fitting on ships of advanced (Tier III) equipment for use in NOx emission control areas (NECAs), giving in to Russian political pressure and endangering the health of Europeans.

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24 January 2014

Brussels, 24th January 2014 – The new draft ‘Polar Code’ of safety and environmental rules fails to address the looming danger of having non ice-strengthened and poorly prepared ships in supposedly ‘ice-free’ polar waters, environmental organisations have warned.

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12 January 2014

The 66th session of the International Maritime Organisation’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC66) this April will see further attempts by industry and countries that support industry by providing “flags of convenience” (ie: countries who allow vessels to use their flags without much control) to undermine the implementation of important ship air pollution agreements.

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