Bremen, 7th May 2007. The conclusions of a stakeholder conference on the EU maritime policy held in Bremen last week appear to have been high-jacked by shipping and port interests.

Bremen, 7th May 2007. The conclusions of a stakeholder conference on the EU maritime policy held in Bremen last week appear to have been high-jacked by shipping and port interests.

The so-called “Bremen Declaration”, presented to representatives of the press before the high-level German Presidency conference on a future EU maritime policy drew to a close, fails to adequately reflect the views of conference participants and was drafted without their consultation.

Seas At Risk, along with other groups present at the meeting, are objecting to the opaque and non-inclusive manner in which the German EU Presidency drafted the declaration, and with the suggestion that it in some-way represents the considered opinion of those present. Seas At Risk is not alone in disagreeing with the content of the Declaration, and in particular with the suggestion that European competitiveness in the maritime sector must be strengthened at all costs and protected from the “adverse impacts” of European rules.

Conference participants were neither informed of the intention to publish the declaration, nor consulted on its content, and it bears no resemblance to the varied views expressed during the meeting. Indeed, you could be forgiven for thinking that the text was drafted by the German shipping and port industries rather than the conference organisers.

Seas At Risk is calling on the European Commission Task Force responsible for the development of an EU maritime policy to disregard the declaration.

"Bremen Declaration" on the future maritime policy of the EU" (4/5/07).

Share This

Subscribe to our newsletter

* indicates required