The European Environment Agency (EEA) has highlighted in its March report the need for drastic action to protect and restore the rich biodiversity of European waters.

The European Environment Agency (EEA) has highlighted in its March report the need for drastic action to protect and restore the rich biodiversity of European waters.

The short assessment put together by the EEA – an agency of the European Union – is one of twelve reports being compiled over 2010. Each month a new report assessing a specific aspect of the European environment will be published.

In the March 'Marine Ecosystems' report, the following threats to the marine environment are addressed:

• eutrophication — increased concentrations of chemical nutrients, resulting mainly from intensive agriculture on land, continue to be a major problem affecting most European seas;
• pollution — although concentrations of hazardous substances are decreasing, their persistence and the large amounts already released mean that negative effects will continue for decades;
• climate change — impacts on marine biodiversity and ecosystems are becoming more and more obvious: sea surface temperatures and sea levels are rising; sea-ice cover is decreasing; and the chemical, physical and biological characteristics of the sea are changing;
• invasive alien species — combined with other pressures such as overfishing, acidification and climate change, introduction of invasive alien species can alter entire ecosystems.

Seas At Risk is actively pressing for stronger measures to prevent the loss of marine biodiversity both within the European Union and the United Nations processes.

Share This

Subscribe to our newsletter

* indicates required