The expansion of what are commonly known as ‘dead zones’ in the world's oceans are growing in size and consequentially further exposing certain fish stocks to higher levels of overfishing, a new study has found.

The expansion of what are commonly known as ‘dead zones’ in the world's oceans are growing in size and consequentially further exposing certain fish stocks to higher levels of overfishing, a new study has found.

As reported by Fishbase.com, the study finds that due to climate change and accelerated global warming, the 'massive' dead zones - hypoxic areas with low or non-existent oxygen levels - are expanding and shoaling closer to the sea surface, and may continue to expand as sea temperatures rise.

As a consequence of the expanding deadzones (one of which already is the size of the continental United States), the habitats of species like billfish and tuna have been reduced substantially, forcing the fish into shallower waters where they are more likely to be caught, the study finds.

The scientists responsible for the research said that as water temperatures increase, the amount of oxygen dissolved in water decreases, squeezing billfish into less available habitats and exposing them to even higher levels of overfishing.

For more information on the study

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