China, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, and India have continued to obstruct and undermine every substantial proposal for tackling GHG emissions from shipping at an IMO meeting in Oslo his week.

The International Maritime Organisation’s special greenhouse gas working group meeting, which concluded today, was tasked with carrying forward a number of key initiatives aimed at reducing GHG emissions from shipping. Despite constructive proposals from the European Commission and EU states, progress on an emissions trading scheme and a levy on marine bunker fuel were blocked entirely, while China and others took every opportunity to weaken and delay plans for design and operational indexes that would reduce CO2 emissions from new and existing ships respectively.

China, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, and India have continued to obstruct and undermine every substantial proposal for tackling GHG emissions from shipping at an IMO meeting in Oslo his week.

The International Maritime Organisation’s special greenhouse gas working group meeting, which concluded today, was tasked with carrying forward a number of key initiatives aimed at reducing GHG emissions from shipping. Despite constructive proposals from the European Commission and EU states, progress on an emissions trading scheme and a levy on marine bunker fuel were blocked entirely, while China and others took every opportunity to weaken and delay plans for design and operational indexes that would reduce CO2 emissions from new and existing ships respectively.

Work on the promising design indexes and guidelines to help ship operators reduce their CO2 emissions will continue at a subsequent IMO meeting in October but the future of the market mechanisms is less clear, although the European Commission may well now take the advice given by Saudi Arabia in the meeting and push ahead with an EU emissions trading scheme for shipping.

The meeting also included a presentation of a new study on GHG emissions from ships that again highlighted the uncertainty surrounding estimating the sector’s contribution to global emissions of CO2. Despite this the meeting failed to agree on a proposal for a mandatory approach that would allow the accurate calculation of emissions.

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A special case

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