The International Maritime Organisation's Antifouling System Convention entered into force today, some seven years after its adoption.

The Convention, which bans the use of Tributyltin (TBT) based antifouling paints globally, and contains a regime for restricting the use of other harmful antifouling paint technologies, met the requirement of ratification by 25 States representing 25% of the world's shipping tonnage last year. The Convention was adopted in London in October 2001 but the ratification process has been slow with the first of the large flag States (Panama) only ratifying in 2007. The Convention has now been ratified by 34 States representing 53% of the world's merchant shipping tonnage.

 

The International Maritime Organisation's Antifouling System Convention entered into force today, some seven years after its adoption.

The Convention, which bans the use of Tributyltin (TBT) based antifouling paints globally, and contains a regime for restricting the use of other harmful antifouling paint technologies, met the requirement of ratification by 25 States representing 25% of the world's shipping tonnage last year. The Convention was adopted in London in October 2001 but the ratification process has been slow with the first of the large flag States (Panama) only ratifying in 2007. The Convention has now been ratified by 34 States representing 53% of the world's merchant shipping tonnage.

The provisions of the Convention in respect of TBT were incorporated into EU law in 2003 (Regulation (EC) No. 782/2003) and it has been offence since 1st January 2008 for any ship visiting an EU port to have TBT on its hull. The entry into force of the Convention brings the rest of the world into line with this.

To go to the International Maritime Organisation's News item

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