Continued wrangling over application of the principle of common but differentiated responsibility has again sunk hopes of a UNFCCC deal on GHG emissions from shipping.

Continued wrangling over application of the principle of common but differentiated responsibility has again sunk hopes of a UNFCCC deal on GHG emissions from shipping.

Brazil, Argentina, China, India & Saudi Arabia led the charge against any agreement that might in any way interfere with a strict application of the CBDR principle, ignoring the IMO's own principle of non-discrimination and numerous proposals for how CBDR could be addressed in this special context.

After promising signs earlier in the week that the UNFCCC process would finally grasp the nettle over marine (and aviation) bunkers and agree a text that would allow the IMO (and ICAO) to get on with establishing targets and measures for these sectors, bunkers disappeared entirely from the negotiating text late on the last day of the meeting.

While the report of the High-Level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing (AGF) did not have the effect that was hoped for, its contents remain in play with the report gaining a brief mention in the final text of the meeting.

The overall outcome of the Cancun negotiations has been given a guarded welcome by environment groups with the general feeling that it marks a break with the failed Copenhagen process and provides a foundation on which a global deal could be built in 2011. CAN Europe are now calling for the EU to respond by increasing its climate ambitions.

CAN Europe Press Release (11/12/10)

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The negotiating texts can be viewed on our COP16 page

COP16 Cancun 2010

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