Slow steaming as a tool to reduce green house gases and other air emissions from the shipping sector was given the green light by industry and environmental groups at a seminar hosted by SAR and T&E this week.
 
 

Slow steaming as a tool to reduce green house gases and other air emissions from the shipping sector was given the green light by industry and environmental groups at a seminar hosted by SAR and T&E this week.

In the run up to the publication of Seas At Risk and Transport & Environment’s commissioned study on ship speed limits - that is expected later this month - the seminar heard about the preliminary findings of the study and positive support for slow steaming from shippers Maersk and Wilhelmsen.

Speaking at the seminar on operational experiences of slow steaming, senior technical advisor Jan de Kat of A.P Moller Maersk said that no operational or technical problems had been experienced with slow steaming and that such a measure will be used now and in the future.

The company, who have been utilizing slow steaming on a number of vessels over recent years, had expected problems such as lubrication loss, fires from soot build-up and corrosion of combustion parts. However, Maersk has found that such problems have not arisen and in fact maintenance and operating costs have fallen as result of slow steaming.

Last year Seas At Risk published a study that addressed the oversupply of vessels and how utilization of those vessels could reduce GHG emissions from the shipping sector by around 30%.


For more information

Bloomberg: More ships may cut speed

Presentations from the seminar

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