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07 June 2019

What better way to raise public awareness of the challenges faced by our seas and coastlines than by sailing the seas? Staff of new Seas At Risk member, Ecologistas en Accion, will shortly set sail for 1,000 miles on the Diosa Maat, stopping at ports in Northern Spain to inform thousands of citizens of the state of our seas and the problems inherent in high levels of unplanned and unsustainable tourism. The tour will give citizens the opportunity to make their voices heard and to call on policy makers to increase their efforts to tackle these coastal challenges.   

Two issues are at the heart of this sailing campaign. The first is the wide range of human pressures exerted on our seas and ocean, which sees biodiversity loss increasing while overfishing depletes Spanish marine reserves and alters ecosystems. The Save Our Seas petition (launched jointly with environmental organisations across Europe) will be promoted during the campaign, seeking to collect thousands of signatures from tourists and Spanish residents alike, in a bid to pressure politicians to honour their legal commitment to making European seas healthy by 2020.

The second issue that Ecologistas en Accion will address during the sailing campaign is the phenomenon of excessive tourism. Current related problems are unregulated building and frequent sewage pollution. As a favourite destinations of highly polluting cruise lines, Spain experiences coastal air quality impacts and associated health conditions among residents. A recent study calculated that luxury cruise giant Carnival Corporation emits 10 times more air pollution (SOx) than all of Europe’s cars. Ecologistas en Accion seeks to raise awareness of the importance of local community action to balance tourists and residents, as well as highlighting the role of politicians at local and international level in setting out clear rules for clean maritime transport and reduced air pollution.

Citizens must be aware of what is at stake in their environment. Small lifestyle changes at an individual level can build to make a real difference, while a better informed population can exert important pressure on politicians to tackle environmental problems ambitiously and with greater vision.

06 June 2019

3, 2, 1… World Oceans Day 2019! On Saturday 8 June, Seas At Risk members, together with thousands of activists, volunteers and citizens across Europe, will celebrate World Oceans Day.

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10 May 2019

This  study assessed the impact of reduced ship speed on dry bulk carriers on different assumptions with regards to the price of fuel, daily earnings and the relationship between the use of main power and electric power on the vessel. The main finding of the study is that reduced ship speed results in most cases in a reduction of transport costs. This study was jointly commissioned by Seas At Risk and Transport and Environment and carried out by the Öko-Institut e.V., one of Europe’s leading independent research and consultancy organisations, providing science-based analysis to governments and corporations. The study uses the costs methodology developed by Martin Stopford, perhaps the leading maritime economist.

10 May 2019

An important new independent study, “Impact of slow steaming for different types of ships carrying bulk cargo”, commissioned jointly by Seas At Risk and Transport and Environment, has been published and clearly demonstrates the economic viability of reducing ship speeds to cut shipping GHG emissions.

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30 October 2018

Two weeks of talks in London on what measures the global shipping sector should take to reduce its climate impact have failed to make progress. Governments meeting at the UN’s International Maritime Organisation (IMO) were supposed to start delivering on their April commitment to decarbonise international shipping but instead became bogged down in procedural matters. The Clean Shipping Coalition said the total lack of urgency was in stark contrast to the impassioned pleas for action made to delegates by the authors of the recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

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05 February 2018

On 16th January, as part of its 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, the European Parliament adopted a strong resolution on international ocean governance, including a very welcome commitment to move towards ending the use of heavy fuel oil by ships in the Arctic.

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22 January 2018

Leading environmental organizations and the global shipping industry have joined in calling for an explicit prohibition on the carriage of non-compliant marine fuels when the global 0.5% sulphur cap takes effect in 2020.

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13 December 2017

Last night European states have been joined by the Marshall Islands, Chile, Mexico and other nations* in a call for urgent action to tackle shipping's contribution to the climate crisis. Signatories to the "Tony De Brum Declaration" have restated their support for the objectives of the Paris Agreement and called for action on shipping consistent with those objectives.

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28 November 2017

Today Members of the Environment Committee of the European Parliament called for a ban on the use of heavy fuel oil in the Arctic. Heavy fuel oil is the cheapest marine fuel and accounts for three quarters of all fuel carried in the fuel tanks of ships sailing in the Arctic. Heavy fuel oil is also one of the world’s dirtiest fuels, a waste product of the refining process. It is almost impossible to clean up in the event of a spill, and produces high levels of black carbon when burnt. Black carbon emissions accelerate the melting of Artic ice and contribute to climate change. Given the severe risks that heavy fuel oil poses to polar environments, the international shipping community has already banned its use in the Antarctic. It is now time to extend that ban to the Arctic.

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30 October 2017

Calls for urgent action to reduce ship greenhouse gas emissions have been met with heavy push-back by many states and big industry groups meeting at the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). A group of Pacific Island and mainly European states clashed repeatedly with those saying that decisions on immediate measures should await the final iteration of the IMO’s comprehensive GHG strategy in 2023, rather than be part of the “initial” strategy in 2018. Green groups Seas At Risk and Transport & Environment, which are members of the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC) [1], said the most obvious immediate measure is to regulate ship speed, with the feasibility and effectiveness of slow steaming having been proven during the recession.

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18 October 2017

Greenhouse gas emissions from three ship types - containerships, bulkers and tankers - could be reduced by a third, on average, by reducing their speed.  The cumulative savings from reducing the speed of these ships alone could, by 2030, be as much as 12% of shipping’s total remaining carbon budget if the world is to stay under the 1.5ºC global temperature rise, the CE Delft study found. 

18 October 2017

Greenhouse gas emissions from three ship types - containerships, bulkers and tankers - could be reduced by a third, on average, by reducing their speed, according to a new independent study that will be presented to the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) next week.  The cumulative savings [1] from reducing the speed of these ships alone could, by 2030, be as much as 12% of shipping’s total remaining carbon budget [2] if the world is to stay under the 1.5ºC global temperature rise, the CE Delft study for NGOs Seas At Risk and Transport & Environment, founding members of the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC), found.

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28 September 2017

Shipping industry proposals for "carbon neutral growth" would mean 4 degree of warming and climate catastrophe. Which shipping companies support that?

17 July 2017

Analysis of the Design Efficiency of Ships that have Entered the Fleet since 2009. 

All ships built after 1 January 2013 need to have an Energy Efficiency Design Index. This measure of design fuel efficiency needs to be better than a reference value which depends on the ship type and size. This study analyses the development of the design efficiency of ships that have entered the fleet from 2009 to 2016. This study finds that the average design efficiency of new ships has improved in recent years. However, the efficiency improvements seem to have stalled in 2016. 

07 June 2017

Governments must implement tighter marine pollution controls or risk further degradation of the oceans, fish stocks and precious ecosystems, the UN is warning this week. Countries are being asked to support a ‘zero draft’ Call To Action at the 2017 UN Ocean Conference in New York that calls for an acceleration of “actions to prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds”. 

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28 April 2017

This document has been submitted by the Clean Shipping Coalition, of which Seas At Risk is member, to the International Maritime Organisation, Marine environment protection committee, 71st session. The study uses the Estimated Index Value (EIV) to investigate trends in the design efficiency of ships built between 2009 and 2016 and the factors that are contributing to changes in these trends and the underlying EIVs. The study finds that while the average design efficiency of new ships has improved in recent years, efficiency improvements seem to have stalled in 2016, and that while a large share of ships that entered the fleet in 2016 had an EIV well above the reference line, there are ships of the same type and similar size with EIVs well below the reference line.

 

 

 

 

21 February 2017

The European Parliament has agreed to support a proposal from its own Environment Committee to include shipping in the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme (ETS).

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16 January 2017

In this letter CAN Europe, Seas At Risk, Transport & Environment, Carbon Market Watch and the Aviation Environment Federation urge the European Commission to ensure the aviation and maritime sectors reduce emissions in line with the temperature goals of the Paris Agreement.

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11 January 2017

The Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC), a group of NGOs with observer status at the UN’s International Maritime Organisation (IMO), have heavily criticised comments by the head of the IMO warning the EU against taking action to address increasing GHG emissions from ships.

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