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04 October 2010

The first global agreement to cut carbon emissions from ships has been blocked by several developing countries. The International Maritime Organisation had been set to approve an Energy Efficient Design Index for ships at its meeting last week in London, following four years of work.

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10 June 2010

The recently formed Clean Shipping Coalition, of which Seas At Risk is a founding member, has gained consultative status at the International Maritime Organisation (IMO).

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03 June 2010

EU greenhouse gas emissions from the shipping sector for 2008 fell for the first time in almost twenty years, a report by the European Environment Agengy (EEA) has found.

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30 April 2010

This month saw the launch of a brand new international environmental coalition dedicated exclusively to the greening of international shipping.

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24 March 2010

A new Seas At Risk report assessing the potential of the shipping industry to cut its GHG emissions has concluded that if the main fleet sectors make full use of existing fleet overcapacity they could reduce emissions by as much as a third.

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02 February 2010

“Market failures” have been blamed for putting off a more carbon efficient shipping sector as experts suggest an emissions trading scheme is ripe for shipping, a European Commission funded report has said.

 

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14 December 2009

A deal on including aviation and shipping emissions in the Copenhagen climate agreement is being blocked by China, India, Saudi Arabia and The Bahamas, putting the 2 degrees Celsius target and $30bn of adaptation funding at risk.

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27 November 2009

Environmental NGOs working on GHG emissions from marine and aviation bunkers have published a joint position ahead of the Copenhagen climate change summit.

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25 November 2009

A European Parliament resolution on the EU strategy for the Copenhagen Conference on Climate Change has upped the stakes on targets for marine bunker emissions.

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16 November 2009
International shipping emissions are a substantial and fast-growing source of emissions. They were left out of the Kyoto Protocol because Parties were unable to agree a methodology for allocating emissions to individual countries.

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30 July 2009
Marine pest species costing billions in damage to fisheries, coastal communities and infrastructure are spreading as the world’s shipping nations continue to largely neglect bringing into effect an international treaty setting out requirements for consistent handling and treatment of ships’ ballast water.  

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03 March 2009

The Council of Ministers has rejected a Commission proposal to count ship emissions towards national totals under a new global climate treaty if the IMO fails to agree reductions.

Ministers did however recognise that shipping emissions are growing fast and stressed that emission reduction targets for the sector “should be incorporated into the Copenhagen agreement and that Parties should commit to work through… the IMO to enable an international agreement that does not lead to competitive distortions or carbon leakage, that is agreed in 2010 and approved by 2011.”

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17 September 2008

The International Maritime Organisation's Antifouling System Convention entered into force today, some seven years after its adoption.

The Convention, which bans the use of Tributyltin (TBT) based antifouling paints globally, and contains a regime for restricting the use of other harmful antifouling paint technologies, met the requirement of ratification by 25 States representing 25% of the world's shipping tonnage last year. The Convention was adopted in London in October 2001 but the ratification process has been slow with the first of the large flag States (Panama) only ratifying in 2007. The Convention has now been ratified by 34 States representing 53% of the world's merchant shipping tonnage.

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27 June 2008

China, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, and India have continued to obstruct and undermine every substantial proposal for tackling GHG emissions from shipping at an IMO meeting in Oslo his week.

The International Maritime Organisation’s special greenhouse gas working group meeting, which concluded today, was tasked with carrying forward a number of key initiatives aimed at reducing GHG emissions from shipping. Despite constructive proposals from the European Commission and EU states, progress on an emissions trading scheme and a levy on marine bunker fuel were blocked entirely, while China and others took every opportunity to weaken and delay plans for design and operational indexes that would reduce CO2 emissions from new and existing ships respectively.

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26 June 2008

The process to reduce GHG emissions from ships is being threatened by developing countries who fail to recognise that the shipping industry is a special case and requires a special global sectoral approach.

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07 April 2008

London, 7th April 2008. Last week the International Maritime Organisation successfully negotiated an end to the use by ships of polluting residual heavy fuel oil but made little progress on greenhouse gas emissions.

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31 March 2008

London, 31st March 2008. The 57th session of the IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee starts today in London, and GHG emissions from shipping is a key item on the agenda.

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27 November 2007

Since the adoption of the Commission’s first communication on maritime safety - "A Common Policy on Safe Seas" - which in 1993 aimed at ensuring that all ships flying under the flag of an EU Member State or entering an EU port comply with international safety standards, the European Community has constantly developed and intensified its maritime safety policy.

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12 July 2007

London, 12th July. Panama today announced that it had completed the process of national ratification of the AFS Convention, ensuring that the Convention will enter into force during 2008.

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20 April 2007

Tributyltin (TBT) is an active ingredient in certain antifouling paints used on ships and is one of the most dangerous substances ever deliberately introduced into the marine environment. An EU ban on the presence of TBT-based antifoulings on ships hulls in EU ports came into effect on 1st January 2008.Concerns over the effects of TBT on marine life go back many years. When the environmental effects of TBT were felt in inshore areas its use on small vessels was restricted, and in 2001 after similar effects were documented in open waters the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) adopted the International Convention on the Control of Harmful Antifouling Systems on Ships (AFS Convention). The AFS Convention took seven years to enter into force and did so on the 17th September 2008 banning globally both the application and presence on ships hulls of TBT-based antifoulings.

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