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06 November 2019

This study investigates and quantifies where possible the climate, environmental and safety benefits of reduced ship speeds. It looks in particular at GHG and black carbon emissions, air pollution, underwater noise pollution, fatal ship whale strikes and maritime safety. The study was commissioned by Seas At Risk and Transport and Environment and undertaken by GL Reynolds Environmental Sustainability Consultants.

10 May 2019

This  study assessed the impact of reduced ship speed on dry bulk carriers on different assumptions with regards to the price of fuel, daily earnings and the relationship between the use of main power and electric power on the vessel. The main finding of the study is that reduced ship speed results in most cases in a reduction of transport costs. This study was jointly commissioned by Seas At Risk and Transport and Environment and carried out by the Öko-Institut e.V., one of Europe’s leading independent research and consultancy organisations, providing science-based analysis to governments and corporations. The study uses the costs methodology developed by Martin Stopford, perhaps the leading maritime economist.

10 May 2019

This guide aims to ensure maritime spatial plans support healthy, productive and biologically diverse seas. It sets out some core principles for good practice maritime spatial planning, things NGOs should be mindful of when engaging in stakeholder participation processes, and includes a repository of useful links to guidance documents and good practice examples.

08 February 2019

This report was prepared by a group of specialised civil society organisations including OceanCare, International Fund for Animal Welfare, Seas at Risk and Natural Resources Defense Council.The goal of this analysis is to assess the measures proposed by Member States to achieve the Good Environmental Status, focusing on the impact of underwater noise which should not adversely affect the marine environment. 

05 July 2018

European seas are in a sorry state. Successive governments have allowed over exploitation, pollution and mismanagement of an environment that was once abundant and diverse. However, simple changes in policy can lead to healthier, more resilient oceans for all Europeans to enjoy for decades to come. Ahead of European elections, Seas At Risk calls on political parties to make their manifestos marine and commit to:

Protecting our marine biodiversity. Saving the seas from our waste. Ending overfishing and ensuring that all fisheries are sustainable

26 June 2018

Since 2013, Belgium has been sponsoring a deep-sea mining exploration contract in the Central Pacific Ocean.  The concerned area is about 77,000 km2, i.e. 2.5 times the size of the country. In this policy briefing, Seas At Risk, WWF Belgium and Bond Beter Leefmilieu call on the Belgian government to reconsider the need for deep sea mining in light of the sustainable development goals, and to put the bar for environmental protection at the highest level. In Dutch.

27 April 2018

Seas At Risk together with 45+ NGOs world-wide call on the International Seabed Authority to provide the space for a fundamental and democratic reflection about the need (or not) for deep seabed mining and its long term sustainability implications.

10 April 2018

Seas At Risk, the Coalition Clean Baltic, the Mediterranean Office for Culture and Sustainable Development and the Black Sea NGO Network recommend three priority areas of action through which Member States can restore our marine environment to health by 2020, as foreseen under the Marine Directive. 

Read more

22 December 2017

Submission by Seas At Risk to the International Seabed Authority in occasion of the consultation of the draft regulations on exploitation of mineral resources in the Area. In this submission, Seas At Risk raises some fundamental questions about  the need to have a fundamental and democratic reflection about the actual need (or not) for deep seabed mining and its long term sustainability implications, the governance flaws within the International Seabed Authority and the application of the precautionary principle. 

 

06 December 2017

In its new report ‘Tackling overfishing and marine litter’, Seas At Risk undertakes an analysis of fisheries and marine litter measures adopted by Member States under the Marine Directive. While noting some progress, it concludes that much more effort is needed to achieve healthy fish stocks and reduce harm from marine litter by 2020. The report also provides recommendations on the measures needed.

05 December 2017

Seas At Risk together with The Pew Charitable Trusts, Oceana, ClientEarth and the Fisheries Secretariat, sent to EU Ministers their recommendations regarding the 2018 Northeast Atlantic and North Sea Total Allowable Catches that the Council will set on 11–12 December 2017. The environmental NGOs urge Ministers to ensure that the 2018 TACs meet the requirements of the Common Fisheries Policy and end overfishing. Documents are: Letter to Ministers, Policy annex and Total Allowable Catches annex. It’s possible to consult previous council recommendations here

16 November 2017

Technical measures are the rules for where, when and how fishing may take place. These measures are fundamental to regulating the impact of fishing on stocks and marine ecosystems. Technical conservation measures will play a key role in achieving some of the main objectives of the Common Fisheries Policy. The document gives a list of key recommendations, which take into consideration how technical conservation measures can achieve these Common Fisheries Policy objectives. NGOs strongly urge members of the European Parliament’s Committee on Fisheries to vote in favour of amendments that strengthen the Commission’s proposal and increase protections for marine ecosystems.

26 October 2017

The study "Single use plastic and the marine environment" includes:

Estimations using limited available data on the quantities of certain single use plastic items used in Europe and nationally. Items investigated include bottles, take away packaging, cigarette butts, plastic straws and coffee cups.  A looks at how legislation can reduce these plastics, how it's ready to go and already enjoys wide public support. Reducing these items could dramatically reduce the amount of plastic pollution in European seas and beaches.  Case studies of plastic reducing pioneers: towns that have already taken action and the benefits they have found.

Please find the full background document here

The summary report below with main findings here below: 

 

19 October 2017

Seas At Risk was invited to make a statement at a conference on the implementation and future of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, jointly organised by the Estonian presidency of the EU and the European Commission on 12-13 October 2017 in Tallinn. Seas At Risk highlighted that rather than allowing for potentially “harmful subsidies”, any future maritime and fisheries fund must contribute to lower impacts on the marine environment and to abundant fish stocks. Seas At Risk called for funding in support of the marine environment to achieve healthy productive seas, the basis for thriving coastal communities.

 

 

18 October 2017

Greenhouse gas emissions from three ship types - containerships, bulkers and tankers - could be reduced by a third, on average, by reducing their speed.  The cumulative savings from reducing the speed of these ships alone could, by 2030, be as much as 12% of shipping’s total remaining carbon budget if the world is to stay under the 1.5ºC global temperature rise, the CE Delft study found. 

09 October 2017

Member States around Europe are signed up to an EU marine law that could save and protect our waters by 2020 if correctly implemented. But so far they are blatantly ignoring their own promises, while our marine ecosystems continue to be destroyed. With only a couple years left to act, the challenges are getting bigger every day:

Over 40% of fish stocks in the North-East Atlantic are still overfished, reaching 90% in the Mediterranean Fish are treated like waste: tens of millions of them continue to be disposed like trash every year, despite the discard ban introduced in 2014 Wildlife protection is a joke: We still only have 9% of seas in Marine Protected Areas around Europe and not 30% as recommended by scientists Most of the existing protected areas are “Paper Parks” with only a small percentage fully protected.

Seas At Risk launched a petition 

05 October 2017

Seas At Risk together with the Fisheries Secretariat sent to European Ministers the recommendations on the European Commission’s proposal on fishing opportunities in the Baltic Sea for 2018. The two NGOs ask Ministers to ensure a sustainable utilisation of our common marine resources. Documents are: The recommendations to the ministers, Annex on fishing opportunities in the Baltic Sea for 2018 and Annex on measures for the European eel. It’s possible to consult previous council recommendations here.

22 September 2017

This document has been submitted to the International Maritime Organisation. In this document the Clean Shipping Coalition, of which Seas At Risk is member, stresses the importance of peaking and reducing emissions from international shipping as soon as possible and presents information in support of the use of operational speed management to this end. 

01 September 2017

In September the Plenary of the European Parliament will vote on MEP Ulrike Rodust’s report concerning the European Commission’s proposal for a multi-annual plan for demersal fisheries in the North Sea. If properly designed, the North Sea Multi-Annual Plan could make a significant contribution to ending overfishing and restoring fish stocks in line with the Common Fisheries Policy, which was significantly shaped by the European Parliament. This position paper lists the NGO priorities such as that the same management targets must apply to all demersal fish stocks and the inclusion of provisions for recreational fisheries.

 

 

17 July 2017

Analysis of the Design Efficiency of Ships that have Entered the Fleet since 2009. 

All ships built after 1 January 2013 need to have an Energy Efficiency Design Index. This measure of design fuel efficiency needs to be better than a reference value which depends on the ship type and size. This study analyses the development of the design efficiency of ships that have entered the fleet from 2009 to 2016. This study finds that the average design efficiency of new ships has improved in recent years. However, the efficiency improvements seem to have stalled in 2016. 

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