Seas At Risk participated in the European Aquaculture Society’s annual Aquaculture Europe 2016 conference which took place from the 20th-23rd of September in Edinburgh, Scotland. Some promising research results (on among others aquaponics) point to the important role innovation can play in making the sector sustainable.

Seas At Risk criticises the decision of the Agriculture and Fisheries Council to sanction continued overfishing of Baltic cod. Fishing limits set above scientific advice will put the already pressured cod stocks at risk of collapse with detrimental effects for the small scale fishing fleets and coastal communities.

Those who will suffer most benefit least from global trade. 

The on-time implementation (in 2020) of a global low-sulphur fuel law for ships would prevent 200,000 premature deaths globally, a health study by a group of leading researchers from the United States and Finland reveals. Oil and gas industry association IPIECA and a group of shipping companies represented by BIMCO, are pushing hard to delay the measure for five years, The Guardian reveals. Later this month the International Marine Organisation (IMO) will decide whether to stick to the 2020 date, which was agreed by acclamation back in 2008 [1]. NGOs Seas at Risk and Transport & Environment (T&E), observers at the IMO, condemn any delay in the implementation of the sulphur cap for ship fuel, which would be unacceptable and unjustifiable.