Greenhouse gas emissions from three ship types - containerships, bulkers and tankers - could be reduced by a third, on average, by reducing their speed, according to a new independent study that will be presented to the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) next week.  The cumulative savings [1] from reducing the speed of these ships alone could, by 2030, be as much as 12% of shipping’s total remaining carbon budget [2] if the world is to stay under the 1.5ºC global temperature rise, the CE Delft study for NGOs Seas At Risk and Transport & Environment, founding members of the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC), found.

The EU Marine Directive requires Member States to achieve clean, healthy and productive EU seas by 2020 -  a much needed holistic approach to marine management. However, 2020 is only two years away and NGOs are concerned that action by Member States is too slow and Programmes of Measures  too weak.  Seas At Risk has therefore launched a campaign to get European citizens involved to  encourage EU Ministers to take further action to achieve their noble commitment.

Ahead of the next Agrifish Council, Seas At Risk and the Fisheries Secretariat published their recommendations to EU fisheries ministers on Baltic Sea fishing quotas in 2018.